Tag Archives: energy

64,000MW can be recovered by plugging electricity leaks

18 January, 2013. PUNE — More than 64,000 MW, nearly 30 percent of India’s installed electricity generation capacity of 225000, is lost in inefficiency and leakages, according to Nityanand Jayaraman, a member of the Chennai Solidarity Group for Koodankulam Struggle. Jayaraman is in Pune as part of the Vasundhara film festival that is being co-organised by Lokayat. Citing Government of India figures, he said that the India’s electricity sector is like a leaky bucket. At the current rate of leakage, the 32000 MW of capacity that is sought to be added through new nuclear power plants in Koodankulam, Jaitapur, Fatehabad, Mithi Virdi, Kovvada and Chutka will disappear without a trace. Efficiency improvement measures can realistically save this 64,000 MW at a nominal cost of about Rs. 50 lakhs per MW. In contrast, nuclear power costs about Rs. 25 crores per MW and coal about Rs. 7 crores. Jayaraman, who is a writer from Chennai, questioned why the Government of India is keen on pouring more money into a leaking bucket while a cheaper and quicker option to bridge the deficit is readily available.

The losses referred to above are in the nature of Transmission and Distribution losses, and losses due to inefficiencies in the equipment used at the consumers’ end. According to a study by the Bureau of Energy Efficiency, Government of India, conservative measures to enhance efficiency of agricultural pumpsets, commercial and domestic lighting, air conditioning and refrigeration and industrial equipment can yield a savings of 19,000 MW.

Agricultural pumpsets, currently being subsidised at Rs. 10,500 crores by the Maharashtra Government, are horribly inefficient and medieval technologies. The Government of India study reports that Maharashtra’s 11 lakh pumpsets account for 17 percent of the state’s total electricity consumption. The pumpsets operate at a pathetically low efficiency of 25 to 35 percent. Improving the efficiency even modestly to 50 percent can yield savings of 1500 million units. Energy efficiency measures in agricultural, commercial, industrial and domestic consumption can easily free up 8000 million units of electricity a year. Further, reducing the State’s transmission and distribution losses from the current 22 percent to 5 percent – which is technically achievable – the state can save more than 12,000 million units. Taken together, efficiency enhancement measures alone can save more than 20,000 million units. That is more than the current deficit faced by the Government of Maharashtra.

Jayaraman said the Governments of Maharashtra and India must first plug the holes in their leaky electricity infrastructure and curb wasteful consumption. He pointed out that 40 crore people in India lacked access to electricity, while electricity was being wasted to illuminate flex banners in prominent city locations like the Nall Junction.

India Extends Bidding Dateline For Odisha, Tamil Nadu UMPPs

The last date for submission of request for qualification (RFQ) 4,000-MW each ultra mega power projects (UMPPs) in Odisha and Tamil Nadu are extended by a fortnight to attract more competent players, reports said.

For Bhedabahal project in Odisha and Cheyyur power plant in Tamil Nadu, the last date has been extended up to November 25 and November 28 respectively. Earlier, the last date for RFQ submission was November 11.

RFQ is the first stage of bidding, which is followed by submission of price bids. Each of the mega projects that would cost nearly Rs.24,000 crore are expected to be allotted by February.

So far, companies such as Tata Power, NHPC, NTPC, Sterlite, JSPL and JSW, among others have purchased………Read more: http://www.rttnews.com/2218729/india-extends-bidding-dateline-for-odisha-tamil-nadu-umpps.aspx?type=in&utm_source=google&utm_campaign=sitemap

Residents voice reservations against Cheyyur plant

Say the power plant will sound a ‘death knell’ to farming and fishing there

Residents of a few villages in Kancheepuram district expressed their reservations over the proposal to start an ultra mega power plant in Cheyyur, Kancheepuram district on Wednesday, on the ground that the entire process of execution lacked transparency.

They conveyed their disapproval when a team of officials from the Coastal Tamil Nadu Power Limited and the Central Electricity Authority along with representatives from leading players in the power sector, visited the project site ……Read more :http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/tamil-nadu/residents-voice-reservations-against-cheyyur-plant/article5269318.ece?homepage=true

Villagers up in arms against Cheyyur plant

By Express News Service – CHENNAI

Published: 23rd October 2013 08:40 AM

Last Updated: 23rd October 2013 08:40 AM

Inhabitants of several villages near Cheyyur in Kancheepuram, where a proposed 4,000 MW thermal power plant is to be situated, on Tuesday alleged that the Power Finance Corporation (PFC) was deliberately withholding key information from prospective investors for the project.

They said the villages in the area were determined not to let the project be implemented as it was posing grave danger to their livelihood. In a press meet here on Monday, residents of several villages around the project area said that the PFC had already conducted a meeting for prospective investors……..Read morehttp://newindianexpress.com/states/tamil_nadu/Villagers-up-in-arms-against-Cheyyur-plant/2013/10/23/article1850408.ece

PRESS CONFERENCE: Land Acquisition Hurdles Make Cheyyur UMPP Riskier

PRESS RELEASE

Land Acquisition Hurdles Make Cheyyur UMPP Riskier

Villagers warned investors considering the Cheyyur 4000 MW UMPP that the project’s lead agency, Power Finance Corporation, was underplaying significant risks by not disclosing legal and land acquisition challenges it faces. Even as land acquisition proceedings for the port and power plant for the 4000 MW Cheyyur UMPP are facing allegations of fraud, farmers owning land for the coal conveyor corridor from port to plant have said they will not part with their lands. They were joined by farmers and others that make their living by farming and fishing on the poromboke lands and backwaters occupied by the project area in sending a letter to the Tamil Nadu Chief Minister underscoring their refusal to part with their lands for the project. Land-owners and users have said this project will hurt their livelihoods and harm the rich water resources of the entire area. Water is more precious than electricity, and there are no alternatives to water, the villagers said. The project site includes 100 acres of waterbodies and backwaters, and is coming up in a taluk that has more than 80 irrigation tanks and rich groundwater.

Speaking at a press conference in Chennai a day before a briefing by Power Finance Corporation for potential investors in the city, farmers warned investors that this project will not take off. Besides the power plant, port site and ash pond, the project requires at least 200 acres of land for which no acquisition proceedings have begun. This includes crucial components such as railway siding, road access from NH45 and the 6.5 km corridor for constructing coal conveyor belt, and for bringing process water from the sea and returning effluents to the sea. This corridor is to pass through dense agricultural and horticultural lands in Vilambur and Gangadevankuppam villages covering a total of 50 acres.

The land acquisition for the port is fraudulent because the land being acquired was expressly rejected as unsuitable by several Governmental teams, activists say. Meanwhile, with owners of the land for the coal conveyor corridor refusing to part with their land, the project is likely to be a still-born as it will have no way of transporting the coal from the port to the plant.

Cheyyur residents told investors to verify allegations and review the risks before sinking their money in the project.

For more information, contact: K. Saravanan – 9176331717

Community Environmental Monitoring

No. 92, Thiruvalluvar Nagar 3rd Cross,

Besant Nagar, Chennai 600 090

Heavy metals in (coal) fly ash a cause for concern

G. VENKATARAMANA RAO

Green activists are very much worried over traces of toxic substances

A view of the Narla Tatarao Thermal Power Station fly ash pond as seen from the ghat road to Kondapalli Fort.

A view of the Narla Tatarao Thermal Power Station fly ash pond as seen from the ghat road to Kondapalli Fort.

Along with spewing pollutants into the air is the fly ash being produced by the Narla Tatarao Thermal Power Station (NTTPS) and stored in the ever-growing ash tanks causing surface and ground water pollution that will have devastating consequences for those living in villages located on their edges.

The public hearing mandatory before granting of Environmental Clearance to any new thermal project seems to have stirred the hornet’s nest with green activist, who came to make environmental impact appraisals prior to it, crying foul.

Toxic constituents in fly ash depend upon the specific coal used for power generation.

Traces or percentages of toxic substances like arsenic, cadmium, mercury, lead, beryllium, boron, chromium, manganese, selenium, strontium, thallium and vanadium, along with dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds are found in fly ash. But it is the heavy metals – arsenic, mercury, cadmium and lead – that are causing concern to green activists here. Nearly 45 per cent of the coal used gets converted into ash. This works out to thousands of tonnes of fly ash.

The fly ash is mixed with water and pumped into huge ash tanks. The heavy metals that get into the water get leeched into the ground water because the fly ash tanks of the NTTPS are not lined, or, they end up contaminating the surface water and get into the food chain. The water is used for drinking by the people and the cattle. Contaminated grass is again consumed by the cattle and humans consume the milk.

The heavy metals, particularly mercury, which are ingested faster then they are excreted, get accumulated in living tissue in small amounts acting like slow poison.

The detection of high levels of mercury in some medicinal herbs collected from the Krishna river-bed downstream the Prakasam Barrage gives credence to the fears of the environmentalist.

The bio-accumulation of mercury causes the ‘Minamata’ disease, named after the place in Japan where it first occurred due to the consumption of fish in which the concentrations of mercury were very high.

Production capacity

Environmental engineer Sagar Dhara, who came to make an appraisal of the environmental impact, said the production capacity of the thermal power station had been increased more then once. It was very important to make a thorough study into the impact of the increase in production on the surrounding environment and community, he stressed.

 

Power firms say Odisha, Tamil Nadu UMPPs not ready for bidding

NEW DELHI: Private power companies have said the two proposed ultra mega power projects in Odisha and Tamil Nadu, likely to be auctioned by the government within this month, were not ready for bidding as many criticalclearances were pending. Read more…..http://articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com/2013-09-13/news/42041631_1_bidding-norms-ultra-mega-power-projects-coal-blocks