Tag Archives: Thermal power station

India Extends Bidding Dateline For Odisha, Tamil Nadu UMPPs

The last date for submission of request for qualification (RFQ) 4,000-MW each ultra mega power projects (UMPPs) in Odisha and Tamil Nadu are extended by a fortnight to attract more competent players, reports said.

For Bhedabahal project in Odisha and Cheyyur power plant in Tamil Nadu, the last date has been extended up to November 25 and November 28 respectively. Earlier, the last date for RFQ submission was November 11.

RFQ is the first stage of bidding, which is followed by submission of price bids. Each of the mega projects that would cost nearly Rs.24,000 crore are expected to be allotted by February.

So far, companies such as Tata Power, NHPC, NTPC, Sterlite, JSPL and JSW, among others have purchased………Read more: http://www.rttnews.com/2218729/india-extends-bidding-dateline-for-odisha-tamil-nadu-umpps.aspx?type=in&utm_source=google&utm_campaign=sitemap

Advertisements

Cheyyur power plant bidding put on hold

By Sruthisagar Yamunan | ENS – CHENNAI

Published: 04th October 2013 07:38 AM

Last Updated: 04th October 2013 07:38 AM

The National Green Tribunal has restrained the project proponents of the proposed Cheyyur Ultra Mega Power Project in Kancheepuram off the East Coast Road from finalising bids for the works until further orders.

The coal jetty for the 4,000 MW power project was challenged by two residents of Panaiyur in July this year after an environment clearance was granted by the Ministry of Environment and Forests last November.

A number of alleged anomalies were pointed out by the petitioners, including the fact that separate Environment Impact Assessments (EIA) were conducted for the coal jetty and power project, which would be separated by a 5 kilometre distance………..Read more http://newindianexpress.com/cities/chennai/Cheyyur-power-plant-bidding-put-on-hold/2013/10/04/article1817904.ece

Heavy metals in (coal) fly ash a cause for concern

G. VENKATARAMANA RAO

Green activists are very much worried over traces of toxic substances

A view of the Narla Tatarao Thermal Power Station fly ash pond as seen from the ghat road to Kondapalli Fort.

A view of the Narla Tatarao Thermal Power Station fly ash pond as seen from the ghat road to Kondapalli Fort.

Along with spewing pollutants into the air is the fly ash being produced by the Narla Tatarao Thermal Power Station (NTTPS) and stored in the ever-growing ash tanks causing surface and ground water pollution that will have devastating consequences for those living in villages located on their edges.

The public hearing mandatory before granting of Environmental Clearance to any new thermal project seems to have stirred the hornet’s nest with green activist, who came to make environmental impact appraisals prior to it, crying foul.

Toxic constituents in fly ash depend upon the specific coal used for power generation.

Traces or percentages of toxic substances like arsenic, cadmium, mercury, lead, beryllium, boron, chromium, manganese, selenium, strontium, thallium and vanadium, along with dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds are found in fly ash. But it is the heavy metals – arsenic, mercury, cadmium and lead – that are causing concern to green activists here. Nearly 45 per cent of the coal used gets converted into ash. This works out to thousands of tonnes of fly ash.

The fly ash is mixed with water and pumped into huge ash tanks. The heavy metals that get into the water get leeched into the ground water because the fly ash tanks of the NTTPS are not lined, or, they end up contaminating the surface water and get into the food chain. The water is used for drinking by the people and the cattle. Contaminated grass is again consumed by the cattle and humans consume the milk.

The heavy metals, particularly mercury, which are ingested faster then they are excreted, get accumulated in living tissue in small amounts acting like slow poison.

The detection of high levels of mercury in some medicinal herbs collected from the Krishna river-bed downstream the Prakasam Barrage gives credence to the fears of the environmentalist.

The bio-accumulation of mercury causes the ‘Minamata’ disease, named after the place in Japan where it first occurred due to the consumption of fish in which the concentrations of mercury were very high.

Production capacity

Environmental engineer Sagar Dhara, who came to make an appraisal of the environmental impact, said the production capacity of the thermal power station had been increased more then once. It was very important to make a thorough study into the impact of the increase in production on the surrounding environment and community, he stressed.